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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



A Phase III Trial of Anlotinib in Metastatic or Advanced Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma, Leiomyosarcoma and Synovial Sarcoma

Sarcoma

This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of AL3818 (anlotinib) hydrochloride in the treatment of metastatic or advanced alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), leiomyosarcoma (LMS), and synovial sarcoma (SS). All participants with ASPS will receive open-label AL3818. In participants with LMS or SS, AL3818 will be compared to IV dacarbazine. Two-thirds of the participants will receive AL3818, one-third of the participants will receive IV dacarbazine.
Sarcoma
III
Keedy, Vicki
NCT03016819
VICCSAR1796

Arginase Inhibitor INCB001158 as a Single Agent and in Combination With Immune Checkpoint Therapy in Patients With Advanced / Metastatic Solid Tumors

This study is an open-label Phase 1 / Phase 2 evaluation of INCB001158 as a single agent and in combination with immune checkpoint therapy in patients with advanced / metastatic solid tumors.
Not Available
I
Gibson, Mike
NCT02903914
VICCPHI1841

Radiation Therapy with or without Apalutamide in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Prostate Cancer

This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy with or without apalutamide works in treating patients with stage III-IV prostate cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-ray to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Drugs, such as apalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Giving radiation therapy and apalutamide may work better at treating prostate cancer.
Not Available
II
Kirschner, Austin
NCT03371719
NRGUROGU006

Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.
Leukemia, Pediatric Leukemia
III
Friedman, Debra
NCT02883049
COGAALL1131

Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)

This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.
Neuroblastoma (Pediatrics)
III
Pastakia, Devang
NCT02176967
COGANBL1232

Open-label Study of FT-2102 With or Without Azacitidine or Cytarabine in Patients With AML or MDS With an IDH1 Mutation

Multiple Cancer Types

This Phase 1 / 2 study will evaluate the safety, efficacy, PK, and PD of FT-2102 as a single agent or in combination with azacitidine or cytarabine. The Phase 1 stage of the study is split into 2 distinct parts: a dose escalation part, which will utilize an open-label design of FT-2102 (single agent) and FT-2102 + azacitidine (combination agent) administered via one or more intermittent dosing schedules followed by a dose expansion part. The dose expansion part will enroll patients in up to 5 expansion cohorts, exploring single-agent FT-2102 activity as well as combination activity with azacitidine or cytarabine. Following the completion of the relevant Phase 1 cohorts, Phase 2 will begin enrollment. Patients will be enrolled across 6 different cohorts, examining the effect of FT-2102 (as a single agent) and FT-2102 + azacitidine (combination) on various AML / MDS disease states.
Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome
I/II
Ferrell, Paul
NCT02719574
VICCHEM1709

A Study Of Avelumab In Combination With Other Cancer Immunotherapies In Advanced Malignancies (JAVELIN Medley)

This is a Phase 1b / 2 dose-optimization study to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary antitumor activity of avelumab (MSB0010718C) in combination with other cancer immunotherapies in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors. The primary purpose is to assess the safety and early signs of efficacy of various avelumab combinations with other cancer immunotherapies, optimizing dosing regimens as appropriate, in a limited series of indications.
Not Available
I/II
Johnson, Douglas
NCT02554812
VICCMD1636

Maintenance Chemotherapy or Observation Following Induction Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma

Multiple Cancer Types

This partially randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
Head/Neck, Neuro-Oncology, Pediatrics
III
Esbenshade, Adam
NCT01096368
COGACNS0831

Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Leukemia, Pediatric Leukemia
III
Friedman, Debra
NCT02101853
COGAALL1331

Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients with Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase III trial studies tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects.
Leukemia, Pediatric Leukemia
III
Friedman, Debra
NCT02339740
COGAAML1331

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