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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



Chemotherapy Levels in the Eyes of Patients with Retinoblastoma

Retinoblastoma (Pediatrics)

Retinoblastoma (Pediatrics)
N/A
Daniels, Anthony
VICCREACH17106

Testing What Happens When an Immunotherapy Drug (Pembrolizumab) is Added to Radiation or Given by Itself Compared to the Usual Treatment of Chemotherapy with Radiation after Surgery for Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Head/Neck

This phase II trial studies the effect of pembrolizumab in combination with radiation therapy or pembrolizumab alone compared to the usual approach (chemotherapy plus radiation therapy) after surgery in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or patients with a second head and neck cancer that is not from metastasis (primary). Radiation therapy uses high energy radiation or protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and carboplatin kill tumor cells by stopping them from dividing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving pembrolizumab in combination with radiation therapy or pembrolizumab alone after surgery may work better than the usual approach in shrinking recurrent or primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
Head/Neck
II
Not Available
NCT04671667
ECOGHNEA3191

Evaluating the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Atezolizumab to Standard Chemotherapy Treatment for Metastatic Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinomas That Originate Outside the Lung

Neuroendocrine

This phase II / III trial compares the effect of immunotherapy with atezolizumab in combination with standard chemotherapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide versus standard therapy alone for the treatment of poorly differentiated extrapulmonary (originated outside the lung) small cell neuroendocrine cancer. The other aim of this trial is to compare using atezolizumab just at the beginning of treatment versus continuing it beyond the initial treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cisplatin and carboplatin are in a class of medications known as platinum-containing compounds that work by killing, stopping or slowing the growth of cancer cells. Etoposide is in a class of medications known as podophyllotoxin derivatives. It blocks a certain enzyme needed for cell division and DNA repair, and it may kill cancer cells. Giving atezolizumab in combination with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide may work better in treating patients with poorly differentiated extrapulmonary small cell neuroendocrine cancer compared to standard therapy with a platinum drug (cisplatin or carboplatin) and etoposide alone.
Neuroendocrine
II/III
Das, Satya
NCT05058651
SWOGGIS2012

Carboplatin with or without Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer with Locally Recurrent Chest Wall Disease That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Breast

This phase II trial studies the effect of carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) with chest wall disease that has come back (locally recurrent) and cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
Breast
II
Abramson, Vandana
NCT03095352
VICCBRE1808

A Study of the Drugs Selumetinib vs. Carboplatin and Vincristine in Patients with Low-Grade Glioma

Multiple Cancer Types

This phase 3 trial compares the effect of selumetinib versus the standard of care treatment with carboplatin and vincristine (CV) in treating patients with newly diagnosed or previously untreated low-grade glioma (LGG) that does not have a genetic abnormality called BRAFV600E mutation and is not associated with systemic neurofibromatosis type 1. Selumetinib works by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and may kill tumor cells. Carboplatin and vincristine are chemotherapy drugs that work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. The overall goal of this study is to see if selumetinib works just as well as the standard treatment of CV for patients with LGG. Another goal of this study is to compare the effects of selumetinib versus CV in subjects with LGG to find out which is better. Additionally, this trial will also examine if treatment with selumetinib improves the quality of life for subjects who take it.
Neuro-Oncology, Pediatrics
III
Pastakia, Devang
NCT04166409
COGACNS1833

Sotorasib Activity in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors With KRAS p.G12C Mutation (CodeBreak 101)

Multiple Cancer Types

To evaluate the safety and tolerability of sotorasib administered in investigational regimens in adult participants with KRAS p.G12C mutant advanced solid tumors.
Miscellaneous, Phase I
I
Iams, Wade
NCT04185883
VICCPHI2025

EA2176: Phase 3 Clinical Trial of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel + / - Nivolumab in Metastatic Anal Cancer Patients

Rectal

This phase 3 trial compares the addition of nivolumab to chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) versus usual treatment (chemotherapy alone) for the treatment of anal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab together with carboplatin and paclitaxel may help doctors find out if the treatment is better or the same as the usual approach.
Rectal
III
Eng, Cathy
NCT04444921
ECOGGIEA2176

Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or did not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT02375204
COGA031102

A Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Patients With Metastatic or Inoperable Locally Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Multiple Cancer Types

This is a Phase Ib / II, open-label, multicenter, randomized umbrella study evaluating the efficacy and safety of multiple immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in patients with metastatic or inoperable locally advanced TNBC. The study will be performed in two stages. During Stage 1, two cohorts will be enrolled in parallel in this study: one cohort will consist of Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)-positive participants who have received no prior systemic therapy for metastatic or inoperable locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (first-line [1L] PD-L1+ cohort), and one cohort will consist of participants who had disease progression during or following 1L treatment with chemotherapy (e.g., paclitaxel, nab-paclitaxel, carboplatin) and have not received cancer immunotherapy (CIT) (second-line [2L] CIT-naive cohort). In addition, participants in the 2L CIT-naive cohort who experience disease progression, loss of clinical benefit, or unacceptable toxicity during Stage 1 may be eligible to continue treatment with a different treatment combination (Stage 2), provided Stage 2 is open for enrollment.
Breast, Phase I
I/II
Kennedy, Laura
NCT03424005
VICCBREP2126

9-ING-41 in Patients With Advanced Cancers

Multiple Cancer Types

GSK-3 is a potentially important therapeutic target in human malignancies. The Actuate 1801 Phase 1 / 2 study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 9-ING-41, a potent GSK-3 inhibitor, as a single agent and in combination with cytotoxic agents, in patients with refractory cancers.
Miscellaneous, Phase I
I/II
Davis, Elizabeth
NCT03678883
VICCPHI19127

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