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Clinical Trials Search at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center



M7824 in Combination With Chemotherapy in Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Multiple Cancer Types

The main purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of M7824 in combination with chemotherapy.
Lung, Non Small Cell, Phase I
I/II
Iams, Wade
NCT03840915
VICCTHO1920

Galunisertib and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Metastatic Androgen Receptor Negative or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Breast

This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of galunisertib when given together with paclitaxel in treating patients with androgen receptor negative or triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Some tumors need growth factors, which are made by the body's white blood cells, to keep growing. Galunisertib may interfere with growth factors and help cause tumor cells to die. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving glunisertib together with paclitaxel may kill more tumor cells.
Breast
I
Abramson, Vandana
NCT02672475
VICCBRE1557

Neratinib HER Mutation Basket Study

Multiple Cancer Types

This is an open-label, multicenter, multinational, Phase 2 basket study exploring the efficacy and safety of neratinib as monotherapy or in combination with other therapies in participants with HER (EGFR, HER2) mutation-positive solid tumors.
Bladder, Colon, Esophageal, Gastric/Gastroesophageal, Neuro-Oncology, Ovarian, Urologic, Uterine
II
Mayer, Ingrid
NCT01953926
VICCMD1403

Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
Germ Cell (Pediatrics), Pediatrics
III
Borinstein, Scott
NCT02375204
COGA031102

Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib or Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Platinum-Resistant or -Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Multiple Cancer Types

This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well cediranib maleate and olaparib work when given together or separately, and compares them to standard chemotherapy in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has returned (recurrent) after receiving chemotherapy with drugs that contain platinum (platinum-resistant) or continued to grow while being treated with platinum-based chemotherapy drugs (platinum-refractory). Cediranib maleate and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cediranib maleate and olaparib together may cause more damage to cancer cells when compared to either drug alone or standard chemotherapy.
Gynecologic, Ovarian
II/III
Brown, Alaina
NCT02502266
NRGGYNGY005

Atezolizumab, Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Is Locally Recurrent, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

Breast

This phase IIa trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab when given together with paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has come back at or near the same place as the original (primary) tumor (locally recurrent), has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may work better in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.
Breast
II
Mayer, Ingrid
NCT03125928
VICCBRE18179

9-ING-41 in Patients With Advanced Cancers

Multiple Cancer Types

GSK-3? is a potentially important therapeutic target in human malignancies. The Actuate 1801 Phase 1 / 2 study is designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 9-ING-41, a potent GSK-3? inhibitor, as a single agent and in combination with cytotoxic agents, in patients with refractory cancers.
Miscellaneous, Phase I
I/II
Davis, Elizabeth
NCT03678883
VICCPHI19127

Bevacizumab and Anetumab Ravtansine or Paclitaxel in Treating Participants with Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Ovarian

This phase II trial studies the side effects of bevacizumab and anetumab ravtansine or paclitaxel in treating participants with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab and anetumab ravtansine, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving bevacizumab and anetumab ravtansine or paclitaxel may work better in treating participants with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
Ovarian
II
Crispens, Marta
NCT03587311
VICCGYN18159ET-CT

A Study Of Ipatasertib in Combination With Atezolizumab and Paclitaxel as a Treatment for Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

Breast

This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of ipatasertib in combination with atezolizumab and paclitaxel in locally advanced or metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) previously untreated in this setting.
Breast
III
Abramson, Vandana
NCT04177108
VICCBRE19111

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