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Cancer Epidemiology Research Program

The Cancer Epidemiology Research Program aims to improve our understanding of the genetic and environmental origins of cancer and to identify biomarkers for cancer risk and progression. This understanding informs the design of effective cancer prevention and control programs.

RESEARCH THEMES

Investigators in the Cancer Epidemiology Research Program concentrate on four main themes: 

Identifying genetic factors linked to cancer susceptibility

Evaluating the impact of dietary, lifestyle, and environmental factors on cancer risk

Identifying genetic and lifestyle factors that predict cancer survival and recurrence

Understanding the differences in cancer risk and mortality in different populations

Meet the Program Members

The Cancer Epidemiology Research Program is co-led by Xiao Ou Shu, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., and Wei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.  The co-leaders serve as liaisons to the director and senior leadership for the fostering of inter-programmatic collaboration and integration of cancer epidemiology into the clinical and basic research activities of the cancer center, including the provision of epidemiologic resources and access to large patient populations for whom the translation of scientific discoveries into practice is important.


Featured Publications

Program News

November 18, 2020

Peterson tapped to direct VUMC’s Center for Precision Medicine

Josh Peterson, MD, MPH, professor of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine, has been named director of the Center for Precision Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, effective since Oct. 1.
November 12, 2020

Breast cancer treatment in older women

Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) plus radiotherapy is the standard-of-care for women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer.
November 5, 2020

Screening younger women for hereditary cancers may be cost effective

Population-wide screening for genetic variants linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer may be cost effective in women between the ages of 20 and 35, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open.